Friday, January 9, 2015

Soul Friend/Anam Cara

Devine Light by deinha1974
Loren's path.
The following poem, written by singer and songwriter Carrie Newcomer, is in the celtic spiritual tradition of Anam Cara, meaning soul friends.  I write about that alot, but not using that name.  My daughter Elissa brought this poem to my attention.  Good thing, too, because I need a break from the horrible news on the political front and on the world stage that is making my blood boil.  


celticbydesign.com 
I love the flow of  Newcomer's poem, the images, the life lessons it affirms. It's how I feel when I read Mary Oliver's poetry.  Newcomer's song reminds me of my brother Loren. She puts into words how I felt whenever I saw him: "You always arrive bringing light,/carried in chipped pitchers,/and dented buckets."    Those old worn vessels that Loren brought with him wherever he went, carried on every journey, his car full of them, his arms loaded with them, full of light.  

Newcomer's poem also evokes the 13th-century Persian mystic poet Rumi, who taught that "the wound is the place where the light enters you." We knew each other's wounds, Loren and I, and we talked about them, honored them.  Did I bring you as much light as you brought me, Loren?  Will our paths cross?  Rumi thought so:  "in that field beyound rightdoing and wrongdoing, we will meet again one day."

Cups Full of Light 
   by Carrie Newcomer
You always arrive bringing light,
Carried in chipped pitchers, 
And dented buckets,
That you slosh it out like soapy water
Washing down the mud and debris
Of my most weary and worried days.
Yes, there are some,
Some who will come bringing 
boxes of shadows, 
Tossed unceremoniously 
Into my oblivious arms,
Which can be with time,
And hindsight,
A different kind of gift 
I suppose.
But you (my friend)
You always,
Always,
Arrive bringing dawn.
You open the windows,
Repair the screen door,
Without fanfare,
Or agenda,
Pour out and share 
Cups full of light,
You let me drink it all down,
Wiping my thirsty soul,
With the back of a grateful hand.



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