Thursday, July 17, 2014

Eleanor Roosevelt visits Sylvania Historical Society

"I think somehow we learn who we really are and then live with that decision."

"I could not at any age be content to sit by the fireside and simply look on."  

"No one can make you feel inferior without your consent."

"The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams."
                                                                                 quotes by Eleanor Roosevelt

Gail Conrad as Eleanor Roosevelt at a Women in History program
sponsored by the Sylvania Area Historical Society.
Eleanor Roosevelt came to the Sylvania Area Historical Society on Wednesday night and shared her story.  She talked about growing up a lonely child;  going to boarding school in England and finding her own voice; marrying Franklin D. Roosevelt and serving as "his eyes, and his legs" through depression and war; and moving on to become an activist for social justice and human rights.

Eleanor came to life through the voice of Gail Conrad, a member of the American Association of University Wormen (AAUW) and a participant in the AAUW's women in history series.  The AAUW series features "living history presentations to introduce children and adults to notable women and the important contributions they have made to society."   The dramatic soliloquys bring the experiences and views of women to life.

Gail Conrad, in a lovely red hat and pearls right out of the 1930s, channeled the interesting life of Eleanor Roosevelt to an appreciative audience.  Eleanor rose from being a lonely child of privilege who thought of herself as "an ugly duckling," to become a wife and mother, partner to a president, and then a social activist and humanitarian, a women of the world, brilliant, confident and compassionate.

The next programs in the Sylvania Area Historial Society's women in history series will feature Annie Oakley and Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell, America's first woman doctor.  Look for more information in our newsletter, the Sylvania Advantage, or on our website at http://www.sylvaniahistory.org.

  
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